Hymns and Rock Music: Park Chapel, Crouch End

Another article in our series about church buildings which have changed their function.

Park Chapel  church today
Park Chapel today

This imposing mid-1850s building is best viewed from Haringey Park N8 or whilst walking on Crouch Hill. Park Chapel has had a chequered 167 year existence. It has changed from an important Congregational church and centre of social activity for the community, to a wrecked church interior with the hall and other spaces used for commercial purposes, particularly children’s TV production and as a recording studio, back once more to a church interior restored for worship.

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Is this Charles Darwin? The Park Road Monkey Mystery

External plasterwork monkey figure in Crouch End
External plasterwork monkey figure in Crouch End

HHS member Andrew Whitehead is intrigued with a monkey which appears as external plasterwork on a house on Park Road in Crouch End dating from the early 1880s. Andrew was introduced to this remarkable architectural embellishment by another HHS member, David Winskill. The monkey seems to have a human face – with a beard and bald head. Could this be a lampoon of Charles Darwin, proponent of the theory of evolution, who was often depicted by his detractors as an ape?

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Ivy-Mantled Tower

As the Old Schoolhouse has been closed, we’ve been running an occasional series sharing extracts from HHS publications. Ivy-Mantled Tower was published in 2015. Its author, Bridget Cherry, is Vice President of HHS and an architectural historian who worked for many years as author and editor of the Pevsner Architectural Guides. This is an extract from Chapter 2 Interpreting the Building: The Evidence for the Medieval Church.

Hornsey Church from the south east by Thomas Prattent, European Magazine, 1797
Hornsey Church from the south east by Thomas Prattent, European Magazine, 1797

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Ivy-Mantled Tower – A History of the Church and Churchyard of St Mary Hornsey, Middlesex

By Bridget Cherry 

Ivy-Mantled Tower is a hard-back book with 138 pages and 202 illustrations. It tells the compelling story of a succession of buildings from the medieval church with its bell tower (which still stands) to an 1833 church, followed by a the building of a late Victorian church which was demolished in 1969. Thankfully, all has not been lost! The ancient tower has been rescued from dereliction thanks to the support of the Rectors of Hornsey and the diligent work of many volunteers.

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Lost Houses: Brick Place

This month we are starting a 2021 series of articles on Lost Houses of the Hornsey area. We begin with Brick Place, the oldest known substantial house we know of, north-east of Hornsey village. It’s appropriate to start with Brick Place because the position of the moat which surrounded it can be clearly identified on the Hornsey Enclosure Map, 1815. David Frith’s book, The Hornsey Enclosure Act 1813, is a new HHS publication, and the moat can clearly be seen on the map on the front cover!

Hornsey Enclosure Map, 1813, Brick Place and moat are in plots 107 and 108, owned by Mr George Wright'
Hornsey Enclosure Map, 1813, Brick Place and moat are in plots 107 and 108, owned by Mr George Wright’

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Lost Houses: Henry Virtue Tebbs of Southwood Hall

We have previously looked at Southwood Hall in Highgate as part of the Lost Houses series and reference was made to two important 19th century occupants, Henry Virtue Tebbs and John Cathles Hill.  This article focuses on the life of HV Tebbs (1797–1876).

Southwood Hall, Highgate
Southwood Hall, Highgate

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Lost Houses: Nightingale Hall, Wood Green

This is the sixth in our series on Lost Houses of our area. This edited text was written by the late Albert Pinching, HHS Sales Manager for 21 years and editor for 14 years of our annual journal, the Bulletin, who died at the end of July this year. The full text was a chapter in People and Places: Lost Estates in Highgate, Hornsey and Wood Green’, published by HHS in 1996. 

The castellated facade of Nightingale Hall, circa 1890
Nightingale Hall, c.1890. This shows a castellated façade with a large conservatory, probably Victorian modifications, on the SW side, suggesting an earlier building in the background.

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Lost Houses: Southwood Hall, Highgate

This is the second article in the series on Lost Houses of the Hornsey area. This house has such interesting connections that a number of articles in the future will focus on its occupants and their connections.

Southwood Hall, Highgate c.1890
Southwood Hall, Highgate c.1890

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