Hornsey in History: Pin’s or (Muswell) Hill

A 1972 series of Hornsey Journal articles by Ian Murray, first Chairman of Hornsey Historical Society and Haringey Council Archivist. The HHS gratefully acknowledges the kind permission of Archant/Ham and High to reproduce this article.

The View down Muswell Hill in 1822 by T M Baynes 1794 - 1852
The View down Muswell Hill in 1822 by T M Baynes 1794 – 1852

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Hornsey in History: South of Hog’s Back

A 1972 series of Hornsey Journal articles by Ian Murray, first Chairman of Hornsey Historical Society and Haringey Council Archivist.  The HHS gratefully acknowledges the kind permission of Archant/Ham and High for this reproduction.

From the Hog's Back, a view of Alexandra Palace, 1972
From the Hog’s Back, a view of Alexandra Palace, 1972

Part of the southern boundary of Hornsey is neatly marked by the ridge of high ground, known as the Hog’s Back which stretches by way of Hornsey Lane and Mountview Road to Harringay West Station. South of this ridge lies Stroud Green and Finsbury Park which have always been within Hornsey parish. Until the end of the 19th century Hornsey extended even further south, as far as Mountgrove Road, leading into Green Lanes opposite Clissold Park.

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Hornsey in History: Crowche Ende Hamlet

A 1972 series of Hornsey Journal articles by Ian Murray, first Chairman of Hornsey Historical Society and aHaringey Council Archivist. The HHS gratefully acknowledges the kind permission of Archant/Ham and High for this reproduction.

Where Crouch End now is, in 1878
Where Crouch End now is, in 1878

Crouch End is derived from an old English word meaning ‘cross’ and ‘end’ is obviously what it says, an end, boundary or limit. So, the name means the cross boundary. The cross refers either to cross roads as four roads have converged here for centuries, or to an actual cross for which there is some evidence.

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Hornsey in History: How Highgate Developed

A 1972 series of Hornsey Journal articles by Ian Murray, first Chairman of Hornsey Historical Society and Haringey Council Archivist. The HHS gratefully acknowledges the kind permission of Archant/Ham and High for this reproduction.

Cholmeley School and Highgate Chapel, c.1833, William West
Cholmeley School and Highgate Chapel, c.1833, William West

Although Highgate was the most important village by the late 17th century, and probably before, it lay only partly in Hornsey. Part of it lay in the parish of St Pancras, and as far as manorial structure is concerned, Highgate village was shared with the Manor of Cantelows, which also included Kentish Town, a sub manor of the Manor of St Pancras created in the late 13th century.

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Hornsey in History: Hornsey in Tudor and Stuart Times

A 1972 series of Hornsey Journal articles by Ian Murray, first Chairman of Hornsey Historical Society and Haringey Council Archivist. The HHS gratefully acknowledges the kind permission of Archant/Ham and High for this reproduction.

Common land on Priory Road, April 2021
Common land on Priory Road, April 2021

From 1603 the court rolls of the Manor of Hornsey have fortunately been preserved. They tell us a great deal about the topography of the area – roads, fields, bridges, woods and so on – as well as about owners of property. As far as the population of the district is concerned, there is no really trustworthy source until the first census of 1801.

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Hornsey in History: Danelaw, Manor and Parish

A 1972 series of Hornsey Journal articles by Ian Murray, first Chairman of Hornsey Historical Society and Haringey Borough Archivist. The HHS gratefully acknowledges the kind permission of Archant/Ham and High for this reproduction

The North View of Hornsey Church, 1750
The North View of Hornsey Church, 1750

For 12 years, from 874, Hornsey was part of the Danelaw, that part of the country under the control of the Danes, until it was liberated by Alfred the Great. The Thames valley was repeatedly ravaged by the Vikings and the remains of a Viking ship were discovered in the Lea at Tottenham in 1901.

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