TELEVISION HOPES AND FEARS

An article from the North Middlesex Chronicle, 13th January 1940

The fact that the Alexandra Palace television studio is closed continues to be a very sore point with the founders of the system. It is feared that the lead gained before the war will be lost, as was the lead in films during the last war, never to be regained.

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WOOD GREEN SCHOOLS RE-OPENED

An article from the Bowes Park Weekly News, 5th January 1940

The six Wood Green elementary schools were re-opened on Tuesday on the terms recently reported, and in spite of wintry weather, the attendance of children was very good.

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VIEWS OF THE MAN AND WOMAN IN THE STREET

PROFOUND THANKSGIVING THAT SO MUCH IS OVER

Extracts from the Hornsey Journal 11 May 1945

Our representatives have been out and about in Hornsey and gathered the following cross section of views which typify the feelings of those spoken to about the war:

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CHILDREN HAVE THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES

An article from the Hornsey Journal, 18th May 1945

VE night celebrations were more or less spontaneous while Saturday’s festivities were well planned and catered-for parties, especially for children. Our reporter set out to visit a number of them and here are his impressions: During the day I had been told that children’s street parties were being organised in Harringay so I proceeded to Wightman Road. Out of the twenty roads connecting Green Lanes and Wightman Road, practically every one of them resembled the scene I had just left in Nelson Road; young and old dancing around bonfires, all kinds of instruments being used, laughing children romping and eating, tables on trestles filled with food. Down Cavendish Road I spoke to Mr and Mrs H T Welland whose home was the HQ of their street party. They told me how everybody had banded together like one family to give the children the best of everything – bags of sweets, oranges, tinned and bottled fruits, homemade cakes and tarts etc.

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HORNSEY CELEBRATES VE DAY

An article from the Hornsey Journal, 11 May 1945

Profound relief was the dominant note in Hornsey’s rejoicings on the morning of VE Day. Then as the day advanced people’s feelings found fuller vent and they let themselves go with whole-hearted joyfulness. This universal feeling was tempered, however, by the fact that the war in the far east still goes on.

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