Hornsey’s Proposed War Memorial: The Continuing Story

Hornsey Cottage Hospital
Hornsey Cottage Hospital

The ongoing fractious debate and depth of feeling felt over the type of borough war memorial best for Hornsey was highlighted in the first of the series Hornsey in 1919. What happened in the intervening months between January and August 1919? Was Hornsey any nearer deciding on the nature of its borough war memorial?

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Hornsey’s Response to the Treaty of Versailles and to Peace Day

An Armistice had ended the Great War on 11 November 1918. The peace treaty between the Allies and Germany was signed on 28 June 1919, exactly 5 years after Archduke Franz Ferdinand’s assassination triggered the conflict. The other Central Powers signed separate treaties. What was Hornsey’s response to these events and why were the children involved?

On 28 June Hornsey’s church bells rang out in celebration and a special Te Deum was sung at Anglican services of thanksgiving. In the evening, fireworks, crackers and rockets were let off in back gardens and bonfires lit in the streets. Flags and bunting were put up and some houses were decorated with Chinese lanterns and fairy lamps. High streets were full of people after the shops closed.

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1895: Women’s Football makes its official debut in Hornsey

With all the interest in the current FIFA Women’s World Cup it is satisfying to know that Hornsey hosted the first official women’s football match attended by an enthusiastic crowd of 10,000 spectators. The 23rd March match was between North and South, the North winning 7-1. One of the South team, Emma Clarke, was the first recorded black woman football player.

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Women and the Vote in 1919

The Representation of the People Act 1918 extended the franchise in parliamentary elections (right to vote) to men aged 21 and over, whether or not they owned property, and to women aged 30 and over who resided in the constituency or occupied land or premises with a rateable value above £5 (or whose husbands did).

At the same time, it extended the local government franchise to include women aged 21 and over on the same terms as men.

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Hornsey Political Activist takes on the Establishment

William Foster Watson (see Hornsey Journal 14 March 1919 and 24 March 1919) used the stage of the Royal Albert Hall and the dock of Bow Street Police Court as platforms from which to proclaim his radical political beliefs. Today most of us know little or nothing about the events and organisations mentioned. What was the British Socialist Party? What was ‘Hands Off Russia’ about? Why were there strikes during and after the war? Who was George Lansbury?

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Hornsey’s Post War Housing Problem

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Preston’s Court, off Hornsey High Street

The opening paragraph of the Hornsey Journal editorial, 7 February 1919 describes the housing shortage which Britain faced in the months after the 11th November 1918 Armistice. How would Hornsey Council tackle this shortage in 1919?

The urban development of Hornsey had occurred mainly during the previous fifty years with private builders supplying nearly all of this housing. It is important to note, however, that the new Hornsey municipal borough (1903) was one of the first in the country to build well-designed houses for working class men and their families, designed by its engineer and surveyor Edwin J Lovegrove.

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Hornsey’s National Kitchens 1918-1919

Female cooks serving the public at a National Kitchen during the First World War

A Ministry of Food was established in December 1916 to combat food shortages and price inflation, results of the ‘submarine menace’.  Hornsey’s MP, Kennedy Jones, was appointed director-general of the Food Economy section.  What was Hornsey’s response? 

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