Rails to the People’s Palace

By Reg Davies

A revised and updated edition of this popular book by railway enthusiast Reg Davies which tells the story of the railway line which once ran between Finsbury Park and the Alexandra Palace from 1873 to 1954.

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Wood Green Through Time

By Albert Pinching 

Another title in this popular format with 92 pages of old and recent views of Wood Green linked by informative captions describing developments in Wood Green over the past century or so. It includes unique images of Alexandra Palace made during the First World War.

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Tottenham and Wood Green – Then & Now in Colour

By Christine Protz and Deborah Hedgecock

This 96-page hardback introduces a new format from The History Press. It presents an old view from the Bruce Castle Museum archive in sepia and a modern full colour view, by local photographer Henry Jacobs, of forty-two locations in Tottenham and Wood Green accompanied by informative text.

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Hornsey Past

By Steven Denford

This comprehensive local history, covering part of Hornsey parish ie.Crouch End, Muswell Hill and Hornsey Village, is in the popular Historical Publications Ltd “Past” series format.

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Civic Pride in Hornsey

By Bridget Cherry

A history and lavishly illustrated description of Hornsey’s prize-winning and Grade II* listed former Town Hall and adjacent 1930s art-deco buildings.

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Bounds Green – A History and Walk

By Albert Pinching

This book is about a less well-known, but nevertheless interesting, corner of Haringey, initially a rural hamlet which became a cosmopolitan residential district of Wood Green.

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A Vision of Middlesex

By Janet Owen and John Hinshelwood

This publication, which celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Hornsey Historical Society, presents a selection of over one hundred and twenty 19th and early 20th Century photographs from the North Middlesex Photographic Society’s survey and record of Middlesex.

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A Brief History of Stroud Green

The name Stroud Green signifies a wet, marshy place, overgrown with brushwood and liable to flooding. Stroud Green, near Highbury, was first mentioned in 1403 when it was no more than a number of farmsteads outside London on the low lying land of Tollington, in Islington, to the west of Brownswood in Hornsey.

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