Two Faithful Servants’ Memorial Returns Home!

A marble memorial to Mary Parsons and Elizabeth Decker, who were servants to a Hornsey family for 57 and 47 years respectively in the late 18th/early 19th centuries, has been returned to St Mary’s Tower, Hornsey High Street.

Read more

VIEWS OF THE MAN AND WOMAN IN THE STREET

PROFOUND THANKSGIVING THAT SO MUCH IS OVER

Extracts from the Hornsey Journal 11 May 1945

Our representatives have been out and about in Hornsey and gathered the following cross section of views which typify the feelings of those spoken to about the war:

Read more

W B Tegetmeier: The Birds and the Bees in 19th Century Muswell Hill

This is the first article in a new series for 2022 – Hornsey Personalities of the Past

W B Tegetmeier by Girardot
W B Tegetmeier by Girardot

The 19th century naturalist who immediately comes to mind is Charles Darwin whose seminal work, The Origin of Species, (1859) rocked the sedate world and beliefs of the Victorian Establishment. It is, therefore, surprising to learn that Darwin rated W B Tegetmeier an authority on several species of birds and on bees and corresponded with him for years. Indeed, Tegetmeier’s house in St James’s Lane, Muswell Hill, came to be known as ‘The Bee House’ as a result of his extensive work studying and breeding them.

Read more

W E Henley

Plaque on the wall of Nayland Rock, 80-82 Tetherdown
Plaque on the wall of Nayland Rock, 80-82 Tetherdown

William Ernest Henley (1849 – 1903) was an English poet, critic and editor of a series of literary
magazines and journals. He was able to choose his contributors to these and he included his own essays, criticism, and poetic works also. Through these journals he introduced the early work of many of the great English writers to late Victorian England. He was said at the time to have had as central a role in influencing culture and literary perspectives, as had Samuel Johnson in the 18th century.

Read more