Mayor marks 50th anniversary of the HHS

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L-R Janet Owen, Sandra Clark, Cllr Adam Jogee, Cllr Elin Weston outside the Old Schoolhouse

The HHS hit the news stands last week when Haringey Mayor Cllr Adam Jogee and Councillor Elin Weston visited the Old Schoolhouse to mark the Society’s 50th anniversary.

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“Paul the Paper” leaves Crouch End

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Paul Saxton

In a fast changing world, elements of stability and continuity are treasured.

Crouch End lost one of its favourite and most enduring landmarks at the end of February 2021 when Paul Saxton clicked the padlock of his kiosk for the last time.

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Hornsey in History: Danelaw, Manor and Parish

A 1972 series of Hornsey Journal articles by Ian Murray, first Chairman of Hornsey Historical Society and Haringey Borough Archivist. The HHS gratefully acknowledges the kind permission of Archant/Ham and High for this reproduction

The North View of Hornsey Church, 1750
The North View of Hornsey Church, 1750

For 12 years, from 874, Hornsey was part of the Danelaw, that part of the country under the control of the Danes, until it was liberated by Alfred the Great. The Thames valley was repeatedly ravaged by the Vikings and the remains of a Viking ship were discovered in the Lea at Tottenham in 1901.

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The Archway Inquiry: A First Hand Account

This article by Pamela Jefferys links with two previous ones on the history of the Archway Road and Highgate which were written in connection with the Archway Road Inquiry 1973. This had been prompted by a proposal to develop a motorway-standard dual carriageway road from the Wellington pub junction, north of Highgate village, and the old London County Council boundary at Archway Bridge. That proposal would have meant, (i) the demolition of about 170 houses and shops, (ii) increased deterioration in the environment, (iii) a blight on property and on the lives of many people in the area.

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Under the Floor Boards

Crouch End man Nigel Moore was recently told by his father he remembered that back in 1968 (when gas pipes were being installed) he had spotted some items in the cellar space underneath the hallway.

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W E Henley

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Plaque on the wall of Nayland Rock, 80-82 Tetherdown

William Ernest Henley (1849 – 1903) was an English poet, critic and editor of a series of literary
magazines and journals.

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Anthony Salvin

Anthony Salvin (1799-1881) was one of the most successful British architects in the first half of Queen Victoria’s reign. The reason why we note Salvin today is because of his association with Hornsey and East Finchley.

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Public Local History Surgeries

The latest Lockdown might provide time for some long-delayed research projects, so just a reminder that the local history surgeries have restarted.  This is an opportunity for all members of the public, as well as members of the HHS and the Crouch End and District U3A to get advice and assistance on their own personal local history research.

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Lost Houses: Brick Place

This month we are starting a 2021 series of articles on Lost Houses of the Hornsey area. We begin with Brick Place, the oldest known substantial house we know of, north-east of Hornsey village. It’s appropriate to start with Brick Place because the position of the moat which surrounded it can be clearly identified on the Hornsey Enclosure Map, 1815. David Frith’s book, The Hornsey Enclosure Act 1813, is a new HHS publication, and the moat can clearly be seen on the map on the front cover!

Hornsey Enclosure Map, 1813, Brick Place and moat are in plots 107 and 108, owned by Mr George Wright'
Hornsey Enclosure Map, 1813, Brick Place and moat are in plots 107 and 108, owned by Mr George Wright’

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