The 2021 HHS Bulletin

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Bulletin 62 marked the 50th anniversary of the founding of the HHS in 1971, and while we could not celebrate the occasion as we had hoped, due to the pandemic, maybe this issue, with its special cover, afforded some consolation.

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The Archway Inquiry: A First Hand Account

This article by Pamela Jefferys links with two previous ones on the history of the Archway Road and Highgate which were written in connection with the Archway Road Inquiry 1973. This had been prompted by a proposal to develop a motorway-standard dual carriageway road from the Wellington pub junction, north of Highgate village, and the old London County Council boundary at Archway Bridge. That proposal would have meant, (i) the demolition of about 170 houses and shops, (ii) increased deterioration in the environment, (iii) a blight on property and on the lives of many people in the area.

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William Wallace and ‘The Flying Spur’ plaque in Southwood Lane, Highgate

In Memory of Malcolm Stokes, long standing and much-valued member of the HHS Publications Committee, who passed away on 19th July. Malcolm lived at Southwood Park, on the site of Southwood Court, where the William Wallace plaque can still be seen in the boundary wall on Southwood Lane. Our condolences to Isobel, his widow.



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Lockdown in Highgate

Hornsey Historical Society Area Map

We are hoping to add to our Lockdown Gallery of images with a collection of people’s written accounts of their experiences during the Lockdown period. In this way we hope to have a written as well as a visual record of these months.

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The Saga of Cromwell House


Cromwell House on Highgate Hill is the only Grade 1 listed building in the former Borough of Hornsey. Never connected with Oliver Cromwell, the house owes its status mainly to its magnificent grand staircase dating from 1638 which is decorated with carved newel posts of military figures. Currently the house is occupied by the High Commission of Ghana. Its history has been a chequered one and was covered in our  newsletter in the 1980s by Peter Barber.

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